Improve patient care and enhance the patient experience without spending more time and money.

Pre-visit laboratory testing

  • Christine Sinsky, MD AMA, Medical Associates Clinic and Health Plans
CME Credits: 0.5

How will this module help me successfully implement pre‑visit laboratory testing?

  1. Strategies to simplify the process of implementation
  2. Answers to common questions and concerns
  3. Advice on what you may encounter during implementation
  4. Case studies describing how practices are successfully using pre-visit labs

CME accreditation information 

Increasing administrative responsibilities—due to regulatory pressures and evolving payment and care delivery models—reduce the amount of time physicians spend delivering direct patient care. By implementing pre-visit laboratory testing, physician practices can increase the amount of information that can be discussed during their in-person encounter with patients. In addition, pre-visit laboratory testing helps decrease the amount of time the team spends following up with patients to discuss results and follow-up care in the days after the visit.

Pre-visit Laboratory Testing
Release Date: March 2015
End Date: Ongoing

Objectives

At the end of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Implement pre-visit laboratory testing
  2. Coordinate patient care at the conclusion of each patient visit
  3. Pre-order laboratory and other diagnostic tests before patient visits
  4. Delegate computerized order entry to the appropriate staff
  5. Empower team members to triage inbox messages

Target Audience

This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of practicing physicians.

Statement of Need

In most medical practices, patients are sent to the laboratory at the end of their visit for the tests that the physician ordered. The next day, when the laboratory test results are received, the care team must contact the patient, discuss the results with the patient, potentially order additional testing, change medications and make referrals to other providers. The process of discussing patient laboratory test results over the phone and coordinating follow up care can reduce the amount of time physicians spend with patients during their clinic day. Such disruptions can overload physicians and staff, leading to burnout. They can also create circumstances that lead to important information being overlooked, compromising patient safety. This pre-visit laboratory testing module provides step-by-step solutions to implement a pre-visit laboratory testing process, where patients have their testing done before the visit and discuss results face-to-face with their physician at the upcoming visit, eliminating the post-visit phone call to discuss results. This module is one of several practice transformation strategies aimed at reducing or eliminating onerous administrative tasks which will enable physicians and staff to provide meaningful care for patients.

Statement of Competency

This activity is designed to address the following ABMS/ACGME competencies: practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communications skills, professionalism, systems-based practice, interdisciplinary teamwork, quality improvement and informatics.

Accreditation Statement

The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

The American Medical Association designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Claiming Your CME Credit

In order to claim AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™, you must 1) view the module content in its entirety, 2) successfully complete the quiz answering 4 out of 5 questions correctly and 3) complete the module.

Planning Committee

  • Kevin Heffernan, MA – AMA CME Program Committee
  • Ellie Rajcevich, MPA – Practice Development Advisor, Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability, AMA
  • Sam Reynolds, MBA – AMA Director, Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability
  • Christine Sinsky, MD – Vice President, Professional Satisfaction, American Medical Association and Internist, Medical Associates Clinic and Health Plans, Dubuque, IA
  • Rhoby Tio, MPPA – AMA Senior Policy Analyst, Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability

Author(s)

  • Christine Sinsky, MD – Vice President, Professional Satisfaction, American Medical Association and Internist, Medical Associates Clinic and Health Plans, Dubuque, IA

Faculty

  • Beth Averbeck, MD – Associate Medical Director, Primary Care, HealthPartners Medical Group
  • John Beasley, MD – Family Physician, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin— Madison
  • J. Benjamin Crocker, MD – General Internist, Medical Director, Ambulatory Practice of the Future, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Thomas P. Healy, JD – AMA, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel
  • David Lynch, MD – Principal, Transformation Medical Practice Consulting
  • Jeffrey Panzer, MD – Medical Director, Oak Street Health
  • Ramin Poursani, MD – Medical Director, Family Health Center Clinic, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • Ellie Rajcevich, MPA – Practice Development Advisor, Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability, AMA
  • Sam Reynolds, MBA – AMA Director, Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability
  • Christine Sinsky, MD – Vice President, Professional Satisfaction, American Medical Association and Internist, Medical Associates Clinic and Health Plans, Dubuque, IA
  • Rhoby Tio, MPPA – AMA Senior Policy Analyst, Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability
  • Rachel Willard-Grace, MPH – Research Manager, Center for Excellence in Primary Care, Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of California–San Francisco

About the Professional Satisfaction, Practice Sustainability Group

The AMA Professional Satisfaction and Practice Sustainability group has been tasked with developing and promoting innovative strategies that create sustainable practices. Leveraging findings from the 2013 AMA/RAND Health study, “Factors affecting physician professional satisfaction and their implications for patient care, health systems and health policy,” and other research sources, the group developed a series of practice transformation strategies. Each has the potential to reduce or eliminate inefficiency in broader office-based physician practices and improve health outcomes, increase operational productivity and reduce health care costs.

Disclosure Statement

The content of this activity does not relate to any product of a commercial interest as defined by the ACGME; therefore, neither the planners nor the faculty have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Media Types

This activity is available to learners through Internet and Print.

Hardware/software Requirements

Adobe Flash 9.0.115 or above
Audio speakers or headphones
Screen resolution of 800X600 or higher
MS Internet Explorer 8.0 or higher, Firefox, Opera, Safari, etc.
Adobe Reader 5.0 or higher

References

  1. Baron R. What is keeping us busy in primary care? A snapshot from one practice. New England Journal of Medicine. 2010;363:495‑496. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMon0910793
  2. Crocker B, Lewandrowski E, et al. Patient satisfaction with point‑of‑care laboratory testing: report of a quality improvement program in an ambulatory practice of an academic medical center. Clin Chim Acta. 2013 Sept;424:8‑11.
  3. Crocker B, Lewandrowski B, et al. Implementation of point‑of‑care testing in an ambulatory practice of an academic medical center. American Journal of Clinical Pathology. In press.
  4. Casalino L, Nicholson S, et al. (2009) What does it cost physicians to interact with health insurance plans? Health Affairs. 2009;28(4):533‑543. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/28/4/w533.full
  5. Day J, Scammon D, Kim J, et al. Quality, satisfaction and financial efficiency associated with elements of primary care practice transformation: preliminary findings. Annals of Family Medicine. 2013;11:S50‑S59. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://annfammed.org/content/11/Suppl_1/S50.full.pdf
  6. Farber J, Siu A, Bloom P. How much time do physicians spend providing care outside of office visits? Annals of Internal Medicine. 2007;147:693‑698. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=737623
  7. Gottschalk A, Flocke S. Time spent in face‑to‑face patient care and work outside the examination room. Annals of Family Medicine. 2005 Nov‑Dec;3(6): 488‑493. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://www.annfammed.org/content/3/6/488.long
  8. Hunt V, Chaudhry R, et al. (2011) Does pre‑ordering tests enhance the value of the periodic examination? Study design‑process implementation with retrospective chart review. BMC Health Services Research. 2011 Sept;11:216. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3180358/
  9. Kabcenell AI, Langley J, Hupke C. (2006) Innovations in Planned Care. Innovation Series. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://www.ihi.org/knowledge/Pages/IHIWhitePapers/InnovationsinPlannedCareWhitePaper.aspx
  10. McAllister J, Cooley W, et al. (2013) Medical Home Transformation in Pediatric Primary Care‑What Drives Change? Annals of Family Medicine. 2013 May/June;11:S90‑S98. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://annfammed.org/content/11/Suppl_1/S90.full
  11. Montori V, Dinneen S, et al. The impact of planned care and a diabetes electronic management system on community‑based diabetes care. Diabetes Care. 2002;25(11):1952‑1957. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/25/11/1952.full.pdf
  12. Moore G. Escaping the Tyranny of the Urgent By Delivering Planned Care. Family Practice Management. 2006 May;13(5):37‑40. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://www.aafp.org/fpm/2006/0500/p37.html
  13. Schiff GD. Medical Error: A 60‑Year‑Old Man With Delayed Care for a Renal Mass. JAMA. 2011;305(18):1890‑1898. doi:10.1001/jama.2011.496.
  14. Sinsky C, Willard‑Grace R, et al. In search of joy in practice: A report of 23 high‑functioning primary care practices. Annals of Family Medicine. 2013;11(3):272‑278. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://annfammed.org/content/11/3/272.full
  15. Stone E, Morton S, et al. Interventions that increase use of adult immunization and cancer screening services: a meta‑analysis. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2002;136(9):641‑651. Accessed on May 15, 2014 from http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=715257

Introduction

What is pre-visit laboratory testing?

This process involves ordering patient laboratory tests for completion before upcoming appointments. This gives physicians the opportunity to discuss results with patients at their visits. Pre-visit laboratory testing eliminates the need to review results later and call patients to explain results and coordinate follow-up care.

Pre-visit laboratory testing introduction

How much time and money will pre-visit laboratory testing save my practice?

This calculator allows you to estimate the amount of time and money you can save by implementing pre-visit laboratory testing in your practice. Enter the amount of time (minutes) per day spent by physicians and staff of activities that could be eliminated by pre-visit lab testing.

Your practice

$
/min

Cost of physician's time

$
/min

Cost of staff time

days/year

Clinic days per year

Estimate savings

min/day

Physician time on
results reporting More info

+
min/day

Staff time on results
reporting More info

=

Time

1h 0m

Time saved

=

Money

$26,400

Annual savings with
Pre-visit Laboratory Testing

Source: AMA. Practice transformation series: pre-visit laboratory testing.. 2015.

Six steps to pre-visit laboratory testing

  1. Re-appoint the patient at the conclusion of each visit
  2. Pre-order labs and other needed tests
  3. Use a visit planner checklist to arrange the patient's next appointment(s)
  4. Arrange for tests to be completed before the next visit
  5. Delegate computerized order entry
  6. Empower staff to manage the inbox
  1. 1

    Re-appoint the patient at the conclusion of each visit

    Re-appointing patients at the conclusion of each visit saves time, promotes continuity and may improve adherence to follow-up visits. It also signals to the patient that, "We want to see you again and we will plan ahead to make your visit as meaningful as possible."

Some practices that choose not to book one year or more in advance instead create a system to store appointment times and associated lab requests, and then contact the patient two weeks before the due date to schedule the appointment and the previously identified pre-visit laboratory tests. Others will send the patient a post-card asking them to call in. While each of these approaches requires more “touches,” they are reasonable alternatives for clinics that do not schedule a year in advance.

  1. 2

    Pre-order labs and other needed tests

    When re-appointing patients, prospectively identify pre-visit lab tests for the next visit. For example, at the end of an office visit schedule a patient with diabetes to return in three months with an FBS and A1c to be completed before the visit so the result is available to the patient and physician at the upcoming visit.

Pre-visit lab through point-of-care testing saved our clinic $25 per visit in physician and staff time.

J. Benjamin Crocker, MD, Internal Medicine, Ambulatory Practice of the Future, Boston, MA J. Benjamin Crocker, MD
  • Will patients remember to come in for a lab test and their appointment if scheduled three, six or even 12 months in advance?

    Many scheduling systems include automated reminder functions. When setting up the next appointment the patient can choose to receive a reminder email, text message, phone call and/or letter for their pre-visit laboratory appointment and their next office visit.

  • What if a patient doesn't come in for their lab appointment?

    The staff can call the patient, inviting them to come in for a lab test that they missed and, when appropriate, remind them of their upcoming appointment with the physician. This phone call can serve as a safeguard to reduce no-shows for office visits. The reminder call can also alert staff to the occasional situation where the patient has moved or is not planning to keep their appointment with the physician for other reasons, allowing that time slot to be opened up for another patient.

  1. 3

    Use a visit planner checklist to arrange the patient's next appointment(s)

    A visit planner is a checklist that allows the physician to indicate the interval until the next appointment and any associated labs to be scheduled. It should be quick and convenient to use, requiring no more than a few seconds of physician time. The visit planner is most useful if it is customized to the practice or an individual physician or specialty.

Visit planner checklist Download See all downloadable tools
  • Our physicians are overwhelmed by the process of selecting a diagnosis code for each test ordered. Do you have any suggestions?

    When creating the visit planner, pair each test with the most frequently used diagnosis codes for that test. The physician can then easily check the appropriate diagnosis code for each patient, alleviating the need in most circumstances to search through a long list for the appropriate diagnosis code. Some practices work with their IT department and/or electronic health record (EHR) vendor to create an electronic version of the checklist.

  • I commonly order bundles of tests. Can the visit planner help with this?

    Yes, you can create “order sets,” or bundles of tests grouped by condition. This simplifies the ordering process and reduces the likelihood of missing laboratory tests. For example, when using an order set a single checkmark provides diagnosis codes along with orders for an entire panel of tests. For a patient with diabetes, this could include orders and corresponding codes for A1c, lipid profile, urine Microalbumin test and creatinine blood test.

  • Is it desirable to have a nurse call the patient one week in advance of the appointment to arrange the needed orders?

    Some organizations hire a nurse to “scrub” the patient's chart one week before the appointment, and then use standing orders to identify the appropriate lab tests. While this involves rework (another clinician reviewing the record and developing an understanding of the patient's needs) and risks inaccuracy (not all of the tests a patient needs will be triggered by protocol), it is still a more efficient, and more patient-oriented system than completing the laboratory tests after the appointment.

  • The next appointment starts today.

    ThedaCare Health System

  1. 4

    Arrange for tests to be completed before the next visit

    Some organizations arrange for patients to have lab testing a few days before their appointment with the physician, whereas others have developed processes for rapid turnaround of the lab testing and results so the patient may come for the lab test earlier on the day of their appointment with the physician. The goal with each approach is to have the lab results available at the visit so the physician and patient can discuss them face-to-face. The physician and patient can complete all management decisions at that time, rather than having the results slowly return to the office, generating multiple phone calls and additional follow-up work for the physician and care team to conduct.

Discuss results face-to-face and decrease phone tag #STEPSforward

;
  1. 5

    Delegate computerized order entry

    Using the visit planner checklist, the physician can check off laboratory tests that need to be administered before the next visit. Entering this information into a computer may require one to two minutes. Several minutes more per task can add up to hours of time per day. Delegating order entry allows physicians to focus on providing high-quality patient care.
  • Does pre-visit laboratory testing require hiring additional staff?

    No. Pre-visit laboratory testing actually requires less staff time. For example, without a pre-visit lab process in place the patient sent for a lab test after the visit may need to call for results. The receptionist or call center fields the call and passes the message to the nurse who discusses the matter with the physician. The physician must then review the chart for clinical details and communicate back to the nursing staff about next steps. The nurse then tries to contact the patient, which may require multiple attempts. These steps are avoided with pre-visit lab testing.

  • Does Stage 2 Meaningful Use (MU2) require physicians to personally enter laboratory and x-ray orders or suffer a financial penalty?

    No. According to MU2, “Any licensed healthcare professional and credentialed medical assistant, can enter orders into the medical record for purposes of including the order in the numerator for the objective of CPOE [computerized provider order entry] if they can originate the order per state, local and professional guidelines. Credentialing for a medical assistant must come from an organization other than the organization employing the medical assistant.” For more information, please visit the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services website regarding MU2 requirements.

  1. 6

    Empower staff to manage the inbox

    Staff can use physician-established protocols to review results and forward only those that are abnormal to the physician. This allows the physician to review the majority of labs only once, at the time of the appointment, and is referred to as “just-in-time” information processing. For example, if a staff member reviews a patient's lab results for urgent abnormalities prior to a visit and finds none, the physician will only need to review the results once at the time of the patient's visit.
Just-in-time information processing
;

Make important decisions about changes in patient care at the appointment.

Testing beforehand gives patients the opportunity to discuss any changes in condition and treatment with their physician face-to-face. By moving decision-making to the front end, your practice can dramatically reduce time spent resolving patient issues after the appointment, including reviewing patient charts, communicating with staff, composing emails or letters and responding to callbacks.

+ More

Organize care around an annual comprehensive care visit as appropriate to specialty.

The annual comprehensive care visit is an effective organizing tool for prevention and care of chronic illness in some specialties, such as internal medicine and family medicine. By organizing multiple components of care around a single visit, you and your patients save time. For example, a patient who may otherwise be contacted to come in for a mammogram in December, a blood pressure screen in March and a pneumococcal vaccine in September can have appointments bundled and have diagnostic testing done before the comprehensive care visit, when the vaccination can also be administered. Managing care components together is more reliable than monitoring and managing each care element separately.

+ More

Develop the capacity to hold future laboratory and other test orders.

It is best is to develop the ability to house future orders either within the lab, x-ray or other electronic information system. This may require working with your commercial laboratory or hospital if the labs are run outside of your organization.

+ More

Extend the “pre-visit paradigm” to other tests.

The same pre-visit testing can be used for x-rays and other diagnostic tests with the same efficiencies and improvements in patient safety and patient engagement. For example, by scheduling a mammogram or follow-up chest x-ray to occur before the next appointment, it is less likely that the test will be missed or results will be overlooked. This process allows patients to discuss their results with their physician face-to-face.

+ More

Conclusion

Scheduling future appointments and pre-ordering needed laboratory tests before the next visit sends the right message to patients. Proactively preparing your patients for their next appointment with pre-visit laboratory testing will ensure efficient use of staff time at each visit. In addition, this approach encourages staff to take a more active role in the reviewing laboratory results to support the physician during a visit.

Pre-visit laboratory testing conclusion

Provide us with feedback to complete the module!

See our Privacy Policy.

Explore other modules Browse modules

Get implementation support

Please contact the AMA to learn about available resources.

Call us at (800) 987‑1106 or send us a message.

Help us improve

Have you implemented innovative strategies to transform your practice and want to suggest a module? Contact us.

References

  1. Baron R. What's keeping us so busy in primary care? A snapshot from one practice. N Engl J Med. 2010;363:495-496. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMon0910793. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  2. Crocker B, Lewandrowski EL, Lewandrowski N, Gregory K, Lewandrowski K. Patient satisfaction with point-of-care laboratory testing: report of a quality improvement program in an ambulatory practice of an academic medical center. Clin Chim Acta. 2013;424:8-11.
  3. Crocker JB, Lee-Lewandrowski E, Lewandrowski N, Baron J, Gregory K, Lewandrowski K. Implementation of point-of-care testing in an ambulatory practice of an academic medical center. Am J Clin Pathol. 2014;14(5):640-646.
  4. Casalino L, Nicholson S, Gans DN, et al. What does it cost physician practices to interact with health insurance plans? Health Aff. 2009;28(4):533-543. http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/28/4/w533.full. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  5. Day J, Scammon DL, Kim J, et al. Quality, satisfaction and financial efficiency associated with elements of primary care practice transformation: preliminary findings. Ann Fam Med. 2013;11(suppl 1):S50—S59. http://annfammed.org/content/11/Suppl_1/S50.full.pdf. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  6. Farber J, Siu A, Bloom P. How much time do physicians spend providing care outside of office visits? Ann Intern Med. 2007;147:693-698. http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=737623. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  7. Gottschalk A, Flocke SA. Time spent in face-to-face patient care and work outside the examination room. Ann Fam Medi. 2005;3(6): 488-493. http://www.annfammed.org/content/3/6/488.long. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  8. Hunt VL, Chaudhry R, Stroebel RJ, North F. Does pre-ordering tests enhance the value of the periodic examination? Study design — Process implementation with retrospective chart review. BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:216. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3180358/. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  9. Kabcenell AI, Langley J, Hupke C. Innovations in Planned Care. IHI Innovation Series white paper. Cambridge, MA: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2006. http://www.ihi.org/knowledge/Pages/IHIWhitePapers/InnovationsinPlannedCareWhitePaper.aspx. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  10. McAllister JW, Cooley WC, Van Cleave J, Boudreau AA, Kuhlthau K. Medical home transformation in pediatric primary care—what drives change? Ann Fam Med. 2013;11 (suppl 1):S90-S98. http://annfammed.org/content/11/Suppl_1/S90.full. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  11. Montori VM, Dinneen SF, Gorman CA, et al; and Translation Project Investigator Group. The impact of planned care and a diabetes electronic management system on community-based diabetes care: the Mayo Health System Diabetes Translation Project. Diabetes Care. 2002;25(11):1952—1957. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/25/11/1952.full.pdf. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  12. Moore LG. Escaping the tyranny of the urgent by delivering planned care. Fam Pract Manag. 2006;13(5):37—40. http://www.aafp.org/fpm/2006/0500/p37.html. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  13. Schiff GD. Medical error: a 60-year-old man with delayed care for a renal mass. JAMA. 2011;305(18):1890-1898.
  14. Sinsky CA, Willard-Grace R, Schuztbank AM, Sinsky TA, Margolius D, Bodenheimer T. In search of joy in practice: a report of 23 high-functioning primary care practices. Ann Fam Med. 2013;11(3):272—278. http://annfammed.org/content/11/3/272.full. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  15. Stone EG, Morton SC, Hulscher ME, et al. Interventions that increase use of adult immunization and cancer screening services: a meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med. 2002;136(9):641—651. http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=715257. Accessed May 15, 2014.

STEPS in practice

Case 1

How's it working in Boston?

+ More

Tell your story

Have you implemented your own idea and want to share it with the community or suggest a module?


Contact us

Downloadable tools

Go to Resource Library

The tools and resources here can offer implementation support for your practice. You can download and modify them to fit your specific needs.

Complete pre-visit laboratory testing toolkit

Access all tools and resources for this module.

Download

(ZIP, 60 MB)

Module Completion

Individual tools

  • Pre-visit laboratory testing module

    Download a printable PDF version of this module.

    Download

    PDF, 549 KB

    Preview
  • Pre-visit laboratory testing PowerPoint

    Use this PowerPoint presentation to review this module with your team.

    Download

    PPT, 61 MB

    Preview
  • Visit planner checklist

    A checklist that allows physicians to indicate the need for another appointment and any associated laboratory tests to be completed before the next patient visit.

    Download

    MS WORD, 49 KB

    Preview
  • Pre-visit laboratory testing implementation checklist

    A checklist to help assess, improve and reassess the implementation process of pre-visit laboratory testing in your practice.

    Download

    MS WORD, 50 KB

    Preview
  • Pre-visit laboratory testing metrics

    Measure the impact of pre-visit laboratory testing.

    Download

    MS WORD, 101 KB

    Preview

Implementation support

The AMA is committed to helping you implement the solutions presented in this module.

If you would like to learn about available resources for implementing the strategies presented in this module, please call us at (800) 987‑1106 or send us a message.

Implementation Support

Share your story

Let us know what's working and what's not working - how can we help you?

Contact us

Connect with a practice consultant

Adopting new practices can be challenging. Connect with a consultant who can guide your team through implementation.

Find a consultant

Email the module "[Module Title]"

Obtaining CME credits with STEPS Forward

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ will be available for the activity. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. In order to claim AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™, you must: 1) view the module in its entirety, 2) successfully complete the quiz by answering 4 out of 5 questions correctly and 3) complete the evaluation.

Already completed this module?

If you have already completed this module, you can claim AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ or receive a certificate of participation through the AMA Education Center.

Close

Get updates

Sign up to receive notifications when new modules and events are added to this website.

All fields are required